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Nietzsche and Zen: Self Overcoming Without a Self

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Add to GoodReads. Nietzsche and Zen. In doing so, he reveals Nietzsche's thought as a philosophy of continuous self-overcoming, in which even the notion of "self" has been overcome. Van der Braak begins by analyzing Nietzsche's relationship to Buddhism and status as a transcultural thinker, recalling research on Nietzsche and Zen to date and setting out the basic argument of the study. He continues by examining the practices of self-overcoming in Nietzsche and Zen, comparing Nietzsche's radical skepticism with that of Nagarjuna and comparing Nietzsche's approach to truth to Linji's. Nietzsche's methods of self-overcoming are compared to Dogen's zazen , or sitting meditation practice, and Dogen's notion of forgetting the self. These comparisons and others build van der Braak's case for a criticism of Nietzsche informed by the ideas of Zen Buddhism and a criticism of Zen Buddhism seen through the Western lens of Nietzsche - coalescing into one world philosophy.

The subsequent "feelings of revenge and resentment" embittered him:[91]. The overman does not follow the morality of common people since that favors mediocrity but rises above the notion of good and evil and above the "herd". Nietzsche According to Heidegger, it is the burden imposed by the question of eternal recurrence—whether it could possibly be true—that is so significant in modern thought: "The way Nietzsche here patterns the first communication of the thought of the 'greatest burden' [of eternal recurrence] makes it clear that this 'thought of thoughts' is at the same time 'the most burdensome thought. While at Basel, Nietzsche lectured on pre-Platonic philosophers for several years, and the text of this lecture series has been characterized as a "lost link" in the development of his thought. Elsner, Gary. You have made your way from worm to man, and much in you is still worm.

[Andre van der Braak] Nietzsche and Zen Self-Over(BookZZ.org)

In doing so, he reveals Nietzsches thought as a philosophy of continuous self-overcoming, in which even the notion of self has been overcome. Van der Braak begins by analyzing Nietzsches relationship to Buddhism and status as a transcultural thinker, recalling research on Nietzsche and Zen to date and setting out the basic argument of the study. He continues by examining the practices of self-overcoming in Nietzsche and Zen, comparing Nietzsches radical skepticism with that of Nagarjuna and comparing Nietzsches approach to truth to Linjis. Nietzsches methods of self-overcoming are compared to Dogens zazen, or sitting meditation practice, and Dogens notion of forgetting the self. These comparisons and others build van der Braaks case for a criticism of Nietzsche informed by the ideas of Zen Buddhism and a criticism of Zen Buddhism seen through the Western lens of Nietzsche - coalescing into one world philosophy.

The study of nihilism may regard it as merely a label that has been applied to various separate philosophies, [7] or as a distinct historical concept arising out of nominalism , skepticism , and philosophical pessimism , as well as possibly out of Christianity itself. The term is sometimes used in association with anomie to explain the general mood of despair at a perceived pointlessness of existence or arbitrariness of human principles and social institutions. Nihilism has also been described as conspicuous in or constitutive of certain historical periods. For example, [11] Jean Baudrillard [12] [13] and others have characterized postmodernity as a nihilistic epoch [14] or mode of thought. Nihilism has, however, been widely ascribed to both religious and irreligious viewpoints.


Nietzsche and Zen Nietzsche and Zen Self-overcoming without a Self André van I am very grateful to them for providing time for research and writing through.


Nishitani Keiji: Practicing Philosophy as a Matter of Life and Death

In Cooperation with the WCC. Since the s Buddhists and Christians have entered into serious dialogical relations in various places around the world. At this conference we will inquire into the transformation triggered by dialogical encounter. The selection of topics is inspired by the work of Lynn A de Silva

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This article represents a study of F. In Nietzsche's works, starting with a certain period, the first references to Buddhism appear and disappear from the pages of his books and notebooks. Nietzsche is also aware of some Buddhist terms, such as, for example, nirvana, and thus, in fact, the reference to Buddhist thinking is much greater. But it proves that not only the letter but also the "spirit" of Nietzsche is important, because his "So Zarathustra said" is imbued with ideas that are very close to Buddhist philosophy, despite the fact that, unlike many other works, explicitly Buddhism does not exist at all never mentioned. True cognition enlightenment or nirvana is the primary purpose for both Buddhists and F.

It examines his idea of the three fields of awareness: consciousness, beneath it nihility, and at bottom emptiness. Existence on the field of consciousness is too superficial to make for a fulfilling life. Drawing from Nietzsche and Heidegger, as well as from the Zen tradition, Nishitani outlines the field of nihility as a place of death rather than life and argues that if we can endure facing our finitude there will come a turn to the deeper field, of emptiness.

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